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CME Offers Advice to Help Keep Summer Travelers Cool

by Lux Joseph 21. June 2015

Recent headlines are full of reports predicting that this summer will be a record-breaker when it comes to airline passengers being bumped from their flights. For many, the prospect of being bumped is frustrating at best, and for those who are unaware of their rights, the results can be maddening, not to mention costly. Add to that ever-changing security rules and new passport requirements and summer travel can seem daunting. With this in mind, CME has prepared a list of tips to help summer travelers stay calm, cool and collected.

Airline Bumping: What You Need to Know

To avoid being bumped:

    Get an advance seat assignment. Passengers with seat assignments are typically only bumped if they arrive late and their seat assignment is released.


    Check-in online. If you do not have an advance seat assignment, or you want to change your seat assignment, check-in online. Most airlines allow you to do so within 24 hours of departure. Seat assignments that were not available at the time of ticketing may be available when checking in online.


    Don't be late. If all else fails, get to the airport early. Some airlines reserve a portion of their seat assignment inventory for airport check-in. If you are denied a seat assignment at check-in, put your name on the "standby" seat assignment list.


If you are bumped or wish to take advantage of airline's request that you give up your seat:

    Know the lingo. Voluntary bumping occurs when a passenger with a confirmed seat assignment agrees to give up his seat for negotiated compensation. It is not regulated by the DOT. Involuntary bumping occurs when an airline forcibly bumps a paid passenger from a flight because it has been oversold. The DOT regulates compensation for involuntary bumping.


    Know what questions to ask. If you volunteer to give up your seat in response to an airline offer of a free ticket, it is important passengers ask about restrictions. Ask about expiration and blackout dates, such as holidays.


    Know your rights. If you are involuntarily denied boarding, and substitute transportation is scheduled to arrive at your destination between one and two hours after your original arrival time (between one and four hours on international flights), the airline must pay you an amount equal to your one-way fare to your final destination, with a $200 maximum. If the substitute transportation is scheduled to get you to your destination more than two hours later (four hours internationally), or if the airline does not make any substitute travel arrangements for you, the compensation doubles (twice the cost of your fare, $400 maximum).


Navigating Security

    Remember 3-1-1. New regulations limit the amount of liquids passengers can take through security in their carry-on luggage to travel-size toiletries of three (3) ounces or less that fit comfortably in one (1) quart-size, clear plastic zip-top bag and the one (1) bag per passenger must be placed in the screening bin. Items purchased after clearing security may be brought on-board. (Visit TravelSense.org to learn about restrictions in Canada, the U.K. and the European Union.)


Traveling Internationally?

    Better get a passport. Effective Jan. 1, 2007, the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative requires a passport or other accepted document for all air travel from within the Western Hemisphere for citizens of the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Bermuda. U.S. citizens returning directly from a U.S. territory (Guam, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Swains Island and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands) do not need to present a passport.


    Plan (way) ahead. The U.S. State Department's Passport Services unit is experiencing a major backlog in processing applications. Rather than taking four to six weeks, routine applications or renewals are now taking 12 weeks. Even expedited service takes about three to four weeks. And, because the service uses a centralized system, travelers cannot get their documents faster by submitting applications directly to a regional processing facility.

At CME, our nurses and physicians experience many of these travel challengers on a daily basis when traveling. CAMTS requires all of our medical staff to have travel insurance and we also encourage all travelers to have it. Depending on the type of policy you have, you may be entitled to a variety of benefits when situations such as those described above. Safe travels this summer!

Meet Michelle

by Lux Joseph 14. November 2014

Commercial Medical Escorts did not become a leader in aeromedical transportation without the help of our nurses, physicians, and paramedics that work tirelessly to provide only the highest level of patient care. Each of our team members meets and exceeds CAMTS requirements and participates in continuing education on a quarterly basis. Today we are introducing you to one of nurses, Michelle. Michelle speaks fluently in German and English and therefore plays a key role in assisting with medical record translation as well as getting medical reports prior to our escort’s departing their home base.
Today we had the opportunity to interview Michelle and find out more about her role at CME and why she does what she does.
 
What is your most enjoyable part of your job?
This is a multifaceted question. It has always been my philosophy that compassion is the key ingredient to being a great nurse, therefore, I would say that helping my patients get safely back to their homes after an unpleasant experience takes precedence. The look of relief on their faces when I first walk into a room is so gratifying, but the gratitude that they express when the transport has been completed is priceless. The wonderful places I get to travel to and explore are also very rewarding. I make sure I get to see as much as I can of everywhere I travel.With the present state of our medical system, nurses are completely overwhelmed with tons of paperwork and too many patients. But what bothers me the most is how unthankful the job can be with little or no recognition or appreciation. Working for Blake, Joey, Tricia, Elaine and Ingrid, I feel so appreciated. They are the most wonderful group of people to work for and with.
 
Where did you gain your experience and knowledge in this field of nursing?
I have a cardiac/critical care background. I also do Pre-op/PACU and private duty nursing. I lived abroad in Germany for 12 years, thus am fluent in German. These experiences coupled with the courses I have taken through CME gave me the basis necessary for the job. Each flight I make lends me further experience and knowledge for best practice in flight nursing.
 
What has been your most interesting transport? Why is that?
My most interesting transport was to Marrakesh. I’d never been to Northern Africa and I found it to be so different than anyplace I’d ever been before. It was also challenging because everyone spoke either French or Arabic and very few spoke any English.
 

What areas of expertise do you have experience in?
I have been in medicine for about 35 years. I’ve been an RN for 23 of those years. I started out as an EMT in Phoenix, AZ. I then worked in a few ERs and ICUs as a tech. When I finished nursing school, I went straight into ICU nursing. I also have trauma, cath lab, special procedures, PACU, chemo provider and private duty experience.
 
When you are not flying, what do you do?
I am very family oriented therefore I spend a lot of time with and around my family. Joe and I have been together for 6 ½ years and we love to travel. Joe has 2 daughters, Kim 31 who lives in Tuscon, Mary 26 who lives in PBG, and one son John 29 who lives in Port St. Lucie. I have two 2 sons. Zachary is 22 and lives close to me in Jupiter and Niklas who is 19 lives in Bavaria, Germany near my Ex-Husband. My grandmother just turned 101 on Oct. 19 and I try to spend a lot of time with her. I grow orchids of all types and colors and love gardening. I also love to cook and I quilt when I have the time. I also like to read books
 
What would you tell future clients of CME?
We are a wonderful team of flight coordinators, paramedics, nurses, and physicians with each patient’s best health and interest at heart. I would tell them that they are in "The best hands".
 
Please describe a difficult trip and the outcome of it.
My most difficult trip was transporting a woman with an extensive psych history who had been on a trip with a tour group in Tuscany, Italy. She hadn’t been taking her medications as prescribed and subsequently had a psychotic episode landing her in a psych ward of a hospital near Pisa. When I walked into the ward, it was like a scene from "One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest". Every person in there appeared to be very over sedated.My patient could not walk, she could not articulate, or form even a simple sentence. In the 5 days she was in the hospital, they hadn’t given her any soap, a toothbrush or toothpaste, no shampoo, no change of clothes or even a comb. I had to get her cleaned up before we flew. The trip was very complicated and it had been a horrible experience for her. Since she had seen almost nothing on her trip, I asked the driver to take us by the Leaning Tower of Pisa where we got her out of the car and took a nice picture with her standing in front. When we got to her brother’s house, she and her family were so relieved that she was home safely. They were all in tears and I got lots of hugs! This is what makes my job so rewarding.
 

No matter what industry you are in it is important to have a mentality like Michelle’s. Anyone can go to work each day and accomplish what needs to get done, but it says a true team member like Michelle to make your program excel to new heights. When nurses, physicians, and paramedics are referred to CME they join a family that will bring your loved one’s home safe and sound.

 

 

The Commission on Accreditation of Medical Transport Systems Site Survey

by Joey 6. February 2014

The Commission on Accreditation of Medical Transport Systems will conduct an accreditation site visit of:

COMMERCIAL MEDICAL ESCORTS

On March 6, 2014-March 7, 2014

The purpose of the site visit will be to evaluate the program’s compliance with nationally established medical transport standards. The site visit results will be used to determine whether, and the conditions under which accreditation should be awarded to the program.            

CAMTS accreditation standards deal with issues of patient care and safety of the transport environment. Anyone believing that he or she has pertinent or valid information about such matters may request a public information interview with the CAMTS site surveyors at the time of the site visit. Information presented at the interview will be carefully evaluated for relevance to the accreditation process. Requests for public information interviews must be made in writing and sent to CAMTS no later than 5 business days before the site survey begins. The request should also indicate the nature of the information to be provided during the interview. Such request should be addressed to:

 

                                Office of the Executive Director

                                Commission on Accreditation of Medical Transport Systems

                                PO Box 130

                                Sandy Springs, SC 29677

The Commission will acknowledge such written requests in writing or by telephone and will inform the program of the request for an interview. The Commission will, in turn, notify the interviewee of the date, time and place of the meeting. 

This notice is posted in accordance with CAMTS requirements and shall not be removed until the site visit is completed.

Date Posted: February 6, 2014

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