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Delta Flight 1086 Skids Off Runway at LaGuardia Airport

by Lux Joseph 6. March 2015

On Thursday, March 5th, Delta Flight 1086, coming from Atlanta, attempted to land in LaGuardia Airport during heavy snow. After the plane touched ground, about halfway through the  7,000 foot long runway it began to slide off towards Flushing Bay, breaking through a fence and stopping on an embankment just short of the icy water.

LaGuardia Airport is known for it’s short runways in comparison to other airports and for it’s close location to the waterfront of Flushing Bay.  More so, being close to three other airports, pilots are forced to navigate through tight turns while preparing to land. Since other airports have more runway space, planes landing in them normally glide over part of the runway before landing. John M. Cox, a former US Airways Pilot, now CEO of consultancy Safety Operating Systems, told ABC news “You put the airplane on the ground and land it.”.

Should a plane accidentally overshoot the landing, the Federal Aviation Administration made it mandatory that at the end of each runway there should be an engineer materials arrestor system. This would act as a measure to be sure the plane stops, as it’s wheels would sink into the material, acting to slow the plane down. The issue was that the plane began to slide off the runway about halfway through, at 4,000 feet.

Because the runway extends onto a steel pier over the water this makes it easy for the runway to freeze over, which would make landing more difficult in very cold conditions. Steve Blazejewski told the New York times that he remembered “skidding forward but veering off to the left.”

To add on to what happened, Jared Faellaci stated, “The wheel felt like they didn’t take, we were going so fast.” He goes on to say “One or two seconds later we skidded off to the left side of the runway.  We skidded for about 20 seconds, and you could feel that we had gone off the pavement. It wasn’t a smooth surface anymore, it was very bumpy.”

According to Patrick Foye, the executive director of the port authority, the runway had been plowed minutes before the incident. He stated that other pilots who had landed earlier “reported good braking action. ”

As the plane approached the river, it was stopped by the bern, which was used to stop the bay from flooding onto the airport runways. Foye said, “The plane did not make contact with the water.” While there was a minor fuel leak, it was quickly dealt with. The passengers made it off the plane safely, using the right wing to get down because the chutes did not deploy.

Jared Kaufman, one of the passengers, told ABC news “As we walked across the runway, it was covered with so much snow that I was wondering: who decided it was safe to land here?”

The airport was closed for several hours after the incident. At around 2:30, LaGuardia airport reopened one of its runways. It was initially reported that the runway would be closed until 6:00pm however all appropriate parties handled the situation very efficiently.

This isn’t the first incident LaGuardia Airport has had during the winter season. On March 2, 1994 Continental Airlines flight 705 began to skid during it’s take off, and found itself on the berm. Around 30 injuries were reported then.

There was an earlier incident on March 23, 1992, where a plane, holding 51 passengers, was trying to take off during a snowstorm and ended up crashing into Flushing Bay, killing 27 passengers.

At Commercial Medical Escorts, safety is a number one priority for our patients, nurses, physicians, and their families. Our dedicated safety committee in collaboration with our operations team, constantly are reviewing and analyzing our transports to ensure safety protocols are being met. It is important that we look at this from all angles to ensure we deliver our patients with a smiling face and peace of mind for every transport.

Tips for Individuals Traveling Alone

by Lux Joseph 2. May 2014

Now more than ever, individuals are striking out and traveling for pleasure by themselves. From safety issues to cultural variations, individuals traveling alone encounter a variety of difficulties that can be avoided if the necessary precautions are taken. 

PLANNING

While it pays for all individuals to be educated travelers, it is especially imperative for those traveling alone to plan every step of their trip--from packing a suitcase to choosing a hotel room. Learning what to expect is the first step in preparing yourself for anything that could go wrong. As the old adage goes—“You never know!”

One of the initial steps to planning a safe and pleasant trip is learning as much as possible about your destination before you go.

Make sure your passport is valid, or if you don’t have one, apply for one at least eight weeks in advance of your trip.

While most travelers are aware of such travel hazards as robbery and hotel security, many don’t realize the potential risks of not adequately researching their destination.

When caught in the bustle of planning a trip, it is easy for travelers to forget that they can be directly impacted by a region’s religious and societal beliefs. In fact, some travelers might find themselves having to adapt their dress and demeanor to the customs of the country they are visiting.

For some destinations it is particularly important to dress conservatively. A travel agent can provide useful tips about an area as well as suggest travel publications that provide details about dress codes and other restrictions for travelers worldwide. Also, be sure to inquire about State Department information and travel advisories regarding your destination.  

PACKING

It is absolutely essential to make at least two copies of important travel and identification documents. Leave one back-up copy in your suitcase and the other with a family member or friend at home.

When traveling abroad include the address and telephone number of the U.S. embassy and consulate for each country on your itinerary in case you experience any difficulties.

Carry only one credit card, and don’t keep all your money in one place. Use covered luggage tags and write your office address rather than your home. Remember to always lock all suitcases and if you make a lot of purchases, consider having your luggage shrink-wrapped.

If possible, pack light so you won’t be weighed down and look weighed down, both of which make you an ideal target for pickpockets. Keep luggage and attire simple-- leave expensive-looking baggage (including camera bags), suggestive clothing, and jewelry home. Some travelers have stored such valuables as video cameras in diaper-bags to throw off would-be thieves. 

Plan to bring a tote that you can attach to your body or if you must carry a purse, take one that has thick shoulder straps and zippered compartments. If you’ll be carrying medication on your trip, carry an extra supply and a copy of the prescription in carry-on luggage.

The wise packer only brings necessities.

TAKE CARE OF HOME

When traveling, don’t forget to safeguard your home. If no one will be home for several days:

·         advise a trusted neighbor of your trip, or arrange for a friend to housesit,

·         set your lights on timers,

·         temporarily cancel newspaper delivery and ask the post office to hold your mail--a pile of newspapers on your lawn or an overflowing mailbox is a surefire way to announce that no one’s around.

 HOTELS

Another consideration for travelers, especially those traveling alone, is lodging. A travel agent can locate friendly hotels and book the safest room possible. Smaller hotels are often safest since the staff is more familiar with guests and more able to effectively monitor who enters and exits the building. Hotels on a well-trafficked street with an active nightlife will also fend away would-be thieves. Avoid “walk-up” style hotels.

When selecting a hotel, ask if they have staff available to escort you to your room late at night.

When requesting a room, keep in mind that ground floor rooms are more susceptible to break-ins than are higher floors.

Ask for a room near the elevators but away from stairwells and any renovation work. These allow intruders to easily access your room and hide if necessary.

Keep in mind you should never accept a room if the clerk loudly calls out your name and room number.  

Make sure the room’s door has both a peephole and a deadbolt. When given the option, store valuables in the safe at the front-desk rather than in-room safes--the main safe is usually better insured.

Hide more expensive clothes under other garments since robbers are most likely to steal what they can easily spot. If anything does get stolen, immediately ask management for help--most hotel theft is committed by staff.

TRANSPORTATION

How you will get from place to place—from your hotel to the convention center or from city to city--is also an important safety consideration. Travel agents can provide information on whether it is safest to rent a car or take public transportation. When traveling abroad, your travel agent can tell you if an International Driver’s Permit is required. Purchase maps and write out directions ahead of time. You want to learn as much as possible about getting around the streets so that you avoid looking like a lost tourist. 

Make sure to bring a cellular phone and car charger in case of an emergency.  If you must stop for directions, only do so at well-lit public areas. Lock all doors while driving and don’t keep any valuables on seats. Also keep maps discrete to avoid looking like a vulnerable tourist.

Reserving rental car through your travel agent also has its advantages in that agents can refer you to proven and trusted rental companies. At your destination, rental agents should always explain the car’s features, provide directions and, in a foreign country, brief you about international traffic signs and rules of the road. Avoid renting hatchbacks--luggage in the trunk can be easily seen. 

MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR TRIP

Now it’s time to leave. A map of the area you will be visiting makes good reading material for the airplane. On an international trip, you might also wish to carry aboard a foreign language dictionary and highlight common phrases you’ll need when you reach your destination. Be prepared with questions about the area so you can ask the concierge about where—and where not—to go. In today’s world, many of these things are easily accessible on your mobile phone, but keep in mind that you may not have wireless or single immediately upon landing. Having a guide right at your fingertips is key to success.

As you begin your journey, you’ll find that the most valuable safety tip is to trust your instincts. You might feel silly, but better safe than sorry. If anything does happen, contact the police immediately, if traveling abroad contact the U.S. Embassy, and save all documents--insurance companies will need them.

Your trip will be more fulfilling if you try to meet with some of the locals. Travelers will find that people all over the world are eager to share their unique experiences and cultures and hear all about yours. Also keep an eye open for tour groups or tour guides who could really offer some inside information about what the area has to offer.

Cruises are a great choice for solo travelers who want safety and security with a lot of fun and nightlife and some cruise lines will even pair up single travelers in a cabin to help keep the cost down.

The more you travel, the more confident you become. So get packing and don’t forget to call your travel agent to make your travel experience hassle-free and as safe as poss

The Importance of Safety within our Industry

by Lux Joseph 14. January 2014

Safety is a top priority for Commercial Medical Escorts and we strive to deliver only the highest level of patient care and safety when bringing patients back home. No matter what industry you are involved in; safety plays a key role to the success of the business. The air medical transport industry monitors safety very closely as does the aviation industry. On a daily basis planes are delayed from taking off due to mechanical failures, equipment malfunction, or other safety related issues. The safety system that the airline industry has in place helps to prevent accidents and other safety related incidents.

This past year, 2013, has been said to be the safest for flying since 1945. Although some of these numbers may appear large to the average individual, they are shockingly low. This past year there were only 269 deaths and 29 accidents. According to the Aviation Safety Network the 10-year average is 32 accidents and 719 fatalities. As you can see, the numbers are significantly lower. Recently AirlineRatings.com released their results on which airline is the safest carrier worldwide. Qantas, the Australian airline is at the top of the list for the safest carrier worldwide. Qantas has been around since the early 1900s. Qantas has a fatality free record since 1951 and continues to demonstrate its commitment to airline safety.  As a traveler there are many things that we do not see or may know that happens to ensure our safe journey to our final destination.

Airline maintenance professionals play a vital role in the preparation for airline takeoff. They are working hard to guarantee aircraft safety procedures are followed and reviewed on a continuous basis. There are a series of checks that need to take place prior to passengers even boarding the plane. In my recent travel experience to New York and Boston we were stuck sitting in the LaGuardia terminal for 3 hours after the initial departure time. The original delay was due to no crew available. Once the crew arrived, passengers quickly jumped to their feet expecting to board immediately. Unfortunately to their surprise we were not allowed to board at that time. The plane had been sitting on the tarmac all day and night during the recent storm and not ready for departure. The crew and maintenance professionals had to begin their series of checks. Prior to takeoff the following events take place:

 

                      Maintaining the Aircraft

                      Planning the Aircraft

                      Securing the Aircraft

                      Ground Operations

                     Passenger Screening

                      Crew Briefings

                      Preparations on the Flight Deck

                      Safety Checks

                      Pre-Boarding

                      General Boarding

                      Closing the Cabin Door

                      Safety Briefing

                      Push Back and Taxiing

                      De-Icing

                      Takeoff

Each of these tasks is critical to safe operation. Qantas has proven their commitment to excellence in airline safety. Similar to the airline industry, Commercial Medical Escorts follows specific procedures to ensure patient safety during all of our transports.

 

 

 

Commercial Medical Escorts has a 100% Safety Record and this is achieved with equipment checklists, thorough pre-flight assessments, and a working environment that promotes safety first. Patient Safety Awareness week is March 2-8, 2014 and CME will be exploring ways to participate and promote this throughout our business practice. Patient Safety Awareness Week is an annual education and awareness campaign for health care safety led by NPSF (National Patient Safety Foundation). Commercial Medical Escorts may not receive a rating for safety like the airlines, but internally we have systems in place to ensure patient safety. Commercial Medical Escorts takes part in The Universal Patient Compact: Principles for Partnership provided by the National Patient Safety Foundation and pledge the following to you as our patient:

·         Include you as a member of the team

·         Treat you with respect, honesty and compassion

·         Always tell you the truth

·         Include your family or advocate when you would like us to

·         Hold ourselves to the highest quality and safety standards

·         Be responsive and timely with our care and information to you

·         Help you to set goals for your healthcare and treatment plans

·         Listen to you and answer your questions

·         Provide information to you in a way you can understand

·        Respect your right to your own medical information

·         Respect your privacy and the privacy of your medical information

·         Communicate openly about benefits and risks associated with commercial medical transport

·         Provide you with information to help you make informed decisions about your care and transport options

·         Work with you, and other partners who treat you, in the coordination of your care and transfer

When you fly with CME, you can rest assure that patient safety is our top priority and bringing you or your loved one home safely will always be our promise to you.

 


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